Softball Throwing Drills-Crowhop Drill

August 27, 2010 at 11:17 am | Posted in Throwing | Leave a comment
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Purpose: To teach the proper footwork of a crowhop step which is essential for developing momentum and power behind a throw. Using the crow hop to increase strength in ones throw is a good softball fielding tip to follow

Procedure: You will be needing softballs and a glove. Start with your toes and body facing the target. Place your cap on the ground about a foot in front. Right-handed throwers will push off on their left foot and land over the hat on their right foot. Left-handers will push off with their right foot and land on their left. When you land, your foot should be squared and your body turned to the directional side as you continue the throwing process. Once again, righties push off their left foot to hop over the hat and land on the right foot, squared, and throw the ball. Vice versa for lefties.

If you have never tried this before, then practice yourself so that you can demonstrate. The first time you introduce this drill you should have players practice without a ball. Once players understand the footwork involved, have them throw the ball. It is very important that players don’t take a skip step. In other words, they do not push off and land on the same foot. It is a hop, from one foot to the other. As they become familiar with the drill, switch the focus to explosive power to generate more distance on each throw.

Softball Throwing Drills – Long Toss

December 8, 2009 at 2:34 am | Posted in Outfield, Throwing | Leave a comment
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Purpose: To develop arm strength and accuracy. This will help develop good outfielders, check these outfield softball fielding tips.

Procedure: Have one ball for each pair of playersĀ  and gloves. Divide the team into pairs. Partners should be of similar age and skill level. Players stand facing each other approximately 30 feet apart. Increase the distance as the season progresses. Each pair has a softball. On the “go” command, one partner throws to the other, and when the coach yells “Go” a second time the partners throw the ball back. Players move back 5 to 10 steps after each pair of throws. Coaches should move up and down the line to make sure players are using correct throwing form, specifically the follow-through. When the players are 80 to 100 feet apart or more, encourage smaller players or those who are not as strong to get the ball to their partner on one bounce. A variation is for everyone to try to reach their partners on one bounce. Then try two bounces.

This drill is now recognized as one of the best methods for stren gth-ening a player’s throwing arm. Players should “crow hop” before throwing the ball, to gain extra power for the throw. The crow hop is a small hop that a fielder makes just before throwing, in order to gain momentum. Coaches should monitor this drill closely and ask if anyone’s arm hurts. Players with sore arms should stop the drill. When they’ve recovered, they can build up strength more gradually.

Variation: Players throw to their partners, as in the standard drill, but if a pair makes a bad throw, that team sits down. The drill continues until just one pair is left.

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